Yoga Alignment Workshop

This workshop is perfect for people who are new to the practice of yoga as well as for more seasoned students wanting to review the basics. During the 2 hours you will be taken through the foundational postures one at a time, while receiving alignment cues and hands on adjustments to help enhance your practice. Some partnering will be involved to help each student really experience these poses in a different way, however it is not required to bring a plus one.

Come, experience your yoga practice and poses by having the time to play with what feels right for your body in an atmosphere were your questions are encouraged. Emphasis on breathing exercises, postural alignment to avoid injury, hands on adjustments.

Join us:

When: Saturday, September 19th

Time: 1-3pm

Where: Hot Box Yoga

Teacher: Casey Walles

Cost: $20





 

3 Wrist Strengthening Exercises to Prevent Yoga Injuries

Wrist injuries are common in yoga, yet we ignore them and move in to poses that put pressure on our wrists without knowing how our muscles support this complex joint. We can learn to take care of our wrists by understanding alignment and anatomy. The strength of the muscles in our arms and shoulders will determine our wrist strength.

Causes of Wrist Injuries

Wrist injuries can be caused for many reasons, but the one that stands out the most is poor alignment of the shoulder. Congestion in the neck and shoulders can impede blood flow and nerve transmission into and from the wrists. Other causes of wrist pain include osteoarthritis, carpal tunnel syndrome, lack of flexibility, tendonitis, repetitive strain injuries, sprains and other sudden injuries.

“If the wrists are not strong or flexible enough to prevent the bones from touching, impingement can happen and aggravate the tendons and ligaments in the area.”

Dr. Kevin Launder, a kinesiologist at Illinois State University, said, “Wrist pain is often caused by impingement, an injury that occurs when your radius (arm bone) hits your wrist bones. It typically happens in people who do a lot of yoga.” In yoga, we are mostly in postures that extend the wrist. For example, plank pose puts a lot of pressure on the joint. If the wrists are not strong or flexible enough to prevent the bones from touching, impingement can happen and aggravate the tendons and ligaments in the area.

The Anatomy of our Hands and Wrists

The hand is designed to bear weight, but it also has a complicated joint structure. It has many stable yet flexible parts with complex muscles and joint actions. 39 muscles work the wrist and hand, while at the same time no muscle works alone.

The wrist is an ellipsoid-type synovial joint, allowing for movement along two axes. This means flexion, extension, adduction, and abduction can all occur at the wrist joint. All the movements of the wrist are performed by the muscles of the forearm.

“Over time, wrist extensors may become weak relative to the wrist flexors, which leads to an imbalance. This means when you are in downward dog or any other weight-bearing pose on the hands, your body will find it difficult to properly distribute the weight to your wrists.

The anterior forearm (top side of the arm) has the wrist flexors muscle group. These flex the hand at the wrist and each of the phalanges (these make the fingers). This muscle group tends to be tense due to overuse. Conversely, the underside of the forearm, the extensor muscle group, going from the palm to the inner elbow, is fairly weak in most of us due to the lack of use.

Over time, wrist extensors may become weak relative to the wrist flexors, which leads to an imbalance. This means when you are in downward dog or any other weight-bearing pose on the hands, your body will find it difficult to properly distribute the weight to your wrists. Since your body is intelligent, it will recruit one muscle group to compensate for another and thus the imbalance can lead to injury. Read more »

Obsessing Over Alignment in Yoga Class

Yoga Room 3

Settle down and unbunch your panties!

Yes, yoga poses must be taught and performed in a way that eliminates the risk for injury. And, yes, the poses should be visually recognizable. (If your Virabadrasana II  (Warrior 2) looks more like a bucket of shit, chances are you’re doing it wrong!)

Asana (the physical exercises most folks simply call yoga these days) is not the goal of yoga, it is simply a tool. According to Patanjali, as described in the Yoga Sutras, the only alignment necessary is to be comfortable, steady, and relaxed in asana.

But many teachers today focus exclusively on the asanas and the physical body. As a long time yoga and asana teacher, I understand the necessity of studying anatomy and physiology. After all, asana is a physical practice. Understanding the human body—its capabilities and its limitations—can help teachers understand how to safely instruct students. It is useful in creating balanced sequences and modifying postures depending on a student’s abilities. It also makes you sound really smart! Read more »

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